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Ghostly BlackBerries After Halloween

by Peter · Published November 4, 2015 · Updated November 4, 2015

irish-ghost-puca-190x300-9979739Henry Morris (1915) recounting from his Childhood beliefs in the Farney Barony

‘Nice ripe blackberries are sweet and palatable; but hungry boys and girls will eat blackberries that are neither sweet of palatable. However after ‘Oidhche Shamhna’ or Hallow Eve no blackberries are eaten. And why? Because on that night the púca goes abroad and crawls over the blackberries covering them with an invisible slime, and where is the boy or girl who would eat a berry soiled with the púca’s slime. The fact seems to be that blackberries after that date are stale and unwholesome. But the púca’s slime is the great deterrent.’

Púca – Ghost.

Journal of the Louth Archaeological Society, 1915.

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Tags: Halloween TraditionIrish MysticismIrish MythologyOidhche ShamhnaPúca Ghost

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Places To Visit In Ireland | Our Ireland – Part 3

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Doolin is an ideal place to see many of the great natural sites that Ireland has to offer. The enclave is a popular spot for those looking to relax in charming pubs that reverberate…

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Things To Do In Limerick Limerick is located in the west of Ireland, at the meeting of the rivers Shannon and the Abbey. Limerick city has 50,000 inhabitants and is the fourth city in…

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Places To Visit In Galway City Galway has something for everyone. There are an excellent bus and tour coach hire services for exploring the many wondrous sights Galway has to offer. City sights should…

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Discover The History And Heritage Of Irelands Famous Castles Ireland has a number of interesting Castles dotted around the country, each with their own history and tales from the past. For people visiting the…

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Combine Surf Tuition and Eco-Trips in Waterford An invigorating marine experience awaits all who visit the T-Bay Surf and Eco-centre to enjoy water sports. Set in the coastal town of Tramore, County Waterford, the centre…

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Irish Songs | Our Ireland – Part 3

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It was down by the sally gardens, my love and I did meet She passed the sally gardens, with little snow-white feet She bid me take love easy, as the leaves grow on the…

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(by Thomas Osborne Davis May, 1689) Shout it out till it ring From Beinn-Mor to Cape Cleir, For our country and king, And religion so dear, Rally, men, rally! Irishmen rally! Gather round the dear…

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(by Thomas Osborne Davis) When on Ramillie’s bloody field, The baffled French were forced to yield, The victor Saxon backward reeled Before the charge of Clare’s Dragoons. The Flags we conquered in that fray, Look…

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(by Thomas Osborne Davis) Oh! The banks of the Lee, the banks of the Lee, And love in a cottage for Mary and me; Ther’s not in the land a lovlier tide, And I’m sure…

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You may travel far far from your own native home Far away o’er the mountains, far away o’er the foam But of all the fine places that I’ve ever been Sure there’s none can…

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Celtic Alphabet

A uniquely Celtic Irish script, Ogam later spread among the Celts of Great Britain. Ogmic inscriptions have been found in Scotland, Wales, Devonshire, Hampshire and the Isle of Man.

Celtic Alphabet Designs
Ogam was inscribed upon wands and upright stone pillars. Celtic alphabet letters were notches, cuts or strokes across the edge of the angle.

The Ogam Celtic alphabet consisted of four types of markings:

  • Dots – one or more dotes to request a letter
  • Lines – right angle to the line of the edge
  • Angled lines – straight lines made at and angle to the edge
  • Cross – two lines crossing each other on the edge making an ‘X’ shape

Below are Free Celtic Letters For You To Reference and Use

Later, when Ogam was recorded in manuscript the dots were replaced with short lines through a horizontal line.

ogam-celtic-alphabet-7841980

The following is taken from an Ogam inscription found on a stone pillar near Donmore head in the West of Kerry, it reads: ERC the SON of the SON of ERCA (descendant of) MONOVINA. Reference from Professor Rhys’s Hibbert Lectures.

Origin of the Celtic Alphabet

The origin of the Ogam Celtic alphabet letters is not entirely known. Some scholars believe it to be quite ancient while others believe its invention to be post-Christian. Ogam does seem to be based on the Roman alphabet or at least been influenced by the Roman alphabet at some stage in its development.

The Celtic God Ogma

Ogma, also called Cermait the “honey-mouthed”, son of the Dagda, was the Celtic god of literature. He is credited with being the inventor of the Celtic alphabet known as Ogam.

Ogma was also the strong man champion of the Tuatha Dé Danann, his epithet is Grianainech, “Sunny-faced’ because of his radiant, shinning countenance.

Celtic Alphabet Reference: Charles Squire’s Mythology of The Celtic People.