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Booley House Festival

Enjoy traditional Irish music and dance at the Booley House Festival

Anyone who wants to experience a collection of vibrant and traditional Irish music can visit and enjoy The Booley House Festival at St Michael’s Hall, Ballyduff Upper in County Waterford.

The exciting and uninterrupted 90 minute show, taking place every Wednesday night between the 1st July 2009 and the 26th August 2009, offers authentic, time-honoured native music from Ireland as well as breathtaking performances from Irish Step dancers from the Michael Ryan School of Irish Dance.

Set dance teachers, Tom Hyland and Ciara Dunne unveil their dancers, who will execute an exciting routine of Irish sets, which often encourage audience participation in the aisles. A recent introduction to the show has been that of brush dancers, which have proved very popular with visitors.

As often has been the hallmark of the Booley House Festival, the musicians provide a distinctive sound performing on traditional instruments with renowned artists including Liam Flanagan, Tony Dunne and Gerry Mckee.

They are accompanied by singers Frances Foley, Ber Browne and Sarah O’Mahoney with a guest spot from an invited artist to ensure the diversity and entertainment of the Booley House Festival continues.

As well as music, resident Seanachai or storyteller, James Lenane will be on hand to entertain with stories of times gone by. This well known narrator is sure to have audiences rolling in the aisles with funny anecdotes and tales.

People wanting to travel around Ireland and watch this presentation of traditional Irish entertainment can hire a car from Dublin or its Airport and travel south to County Waterford and onto the small rural community of Ballyduff where the Booley House Festival can be enjoyed.

The show, which was first produced in 1991, has continued to evolve and become the inspiring spectacle it is today, supported by a 70 plus strong cast of all ages.

Booley House performers have entertained crowds at many festivals throughout Ireland and Europe over the recent years and performed for EU politicians at a conference in Cork in 2001.

Many of their dancers have gone on to join the Riverdance troupes performing to audiences all around the world.

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Irish Baby Girl Names

Popular and Traditional Irish Girl Names

Do you want to give your baby girl an Irish name reflective of your Irish roots?

Below I have listed some of the most popular Irish names for a girl in Ireland (according to the Central Statistics Office of Ireland). The list of Irish girls names includes the Gaelic spelling, the meaning of the name, and the Anglo-Saxon version of the name when applicable.

  1. Abaigeal – Gaelic for Abigail; “father’s joy”
  2. Áine – often used for Anne; “joy, praise”
  3. Aleanbh – Gaelic for Alannah; “the bright fair one, beautiful child”
  4. Aoife – Gaelic for Eve; “life-giving”
  5. Brenna – “raven-haired”
  6. Bridget – “strong, spirited”
  7. Caitlin – Gaelic for Catherine; “pure”
  8. Ceallach – Gaelic for Kelly; “a warrior”
  9. Ceilí – Gaelic for Kayleigh; “party, celebration”
  10. Clár – Gaelic for Claire; “bright”
  11. Eilís – Gaelic for Elizabeth; “consecrated to God”
  12. Erin – “from Ireland”
  13. Fallon – “a leader”
  14. Fíona – “the fair one”
  15. Isibéal – Gaelic for Isabel/Isabella; “consecrated to God”
  16. Mairéad – Gaelic for Margaret; “pearl”
  17. Máire – Gaelic for Mary; “bitter”
  18. Nuala – Gaelic for Nola; “fair-shouldered one”
  19. Ráichéal – Gaelic for Rachael; “little lamb”
  20. Riona – “a queen, queen-like”
  21. Saraid – Gaelic for Sarah; “princess”
  22. Shannon – “wise one”
  23. Sháuna – feminine of Sean; “God is gracious”
  24. Sinéad – Gaelic for Jane; “gracious, merciful”
  25. Siobhán – Gaelic for Joan; “God is gracious”

These are just a few of the many popular Irish girls names for a baby girl. We will add more names as time goes by so please call back to see the updated list of Irish baby girls names..

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Irish Water Deadline Extended…Again

The Minister for the Environment Alan Kelly confirmed today that 30 June will be the latest deadline for registering with Irish Water. Those who register will be eligible to receive the €100 water conservation grant. This is seen by many as a bribe to entice and scare cash strapped householders into registering.

The following is an extract from an article posted today on RTE.ie, a link to the entire article is below.

Mr Murphy said Saturday’s protest shows the strength of the anti-charge movement, adding that the Government is now attempting to intimidate people into paying, which he called “bullying behaviour”…

Image Copyright RTE (www.RTE.ie)

Mr Murphy questioned the figure of 130,000 people which Minister Kelly said was the number who had registered with Irish Water in the past month, bringing the total of registrations to 1.23 million.

Mr Murphy said that Irish Water had given him the 1.23 million figure over a month ago.

He said the charges would be beaten by a campaign of non-payment, and that whatever government came into power in 2016 would be under “massive pressure” to abolish the charges.

Read the entire article at RTE news

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The Rare Oul’ Times

Raised on songs and stories, heroes of renown The passing tales and glories, that once was Dublin town The hallowed halls and houses, the haunting children’s rhymes

That once was Dublin city in the rare old times

Chorus: Ring a-ring a-rosie, as the light declines

I remember Dublin city in the rare oul’ times

My name it is Sean Dempsey, as Dublin as can be Born hard and late in Pimlico, in a house that ceased to be By trade I was a cooper, lost out to redundancy Like my house that fell to progress, my trade’s a memory And I courted Peggy Dignan, as pretty as you please A rogue and child of Mary, from the rebel Liberties I lost her to a student chap, with skin as black as coal

When he took her off to Birmingham, she took away my soul

The years they made me bitter, tha gargle dims me brain ’cause Dublin keeps on changing, and nothing seems the same The Pillar and the Met have gone, the Royal long since pulled down

As the gray unyielding concrete, makes a city of my town

Fare thee well sweet Anna Liffey, I can no longer stay And watch the new glass cages, that spring up along the Quay My mind’s too full of memories, too old to hear new chimes

I’m part of what was Dublin, in the rare old times

Chorus: Ring a-ring a-rosie, as the light declines

I remember Dublin city in the rare oul’ times

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Farewell to ‘King Henry’ Shefflin

March 25, 2015 is the day that the ‘King of the Cats’ Henry Shefflin announced his retirement from inter-county hurling after winning 10 All-Ireland Hurling Championships, 13 Leinster Senior Hurling Championships, 6 Allianz Leagues and a 3 time winner of the GAA/GPA Hurler of the Year award.

To celebrate King Henry’s hurling exploits, we’ve gathered some videos for you to enjoy.

Farewell King Henry

Henry Shefflin Retirement Statement

The Wizardry of Henry Shefflin

Dónal Óg Cusack on the brilliance of Henry Shefflin

Henry Shefflin Tribute

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Top Tips For Irish Family Researchers

“How can an Irish man spell his name? Anyway he wanted to!”

Have you ever wondered why so many Irish surnames are spelled differently? This video will help you understand Irish surnames, different spellings and other tips for your Irish heritage research.

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Seven Drunken Nights

[16 Sept,1934 – 16 Aug, 2008 – Irish folk singer and musician (The Dubliners), actor.]

About The Song

As Ronnie Drew usually says in his introduction “It’s called Seven Drunken Nights, but we’re only allowed to sing five of them.”

As I went home on Monday night as drunk as drunk could be I saw a horse outside the door where my old horse should be Well, I called me wife and I said to her: Will you kindly tell to me

Who owns that horse outside the door where my old horse should be?

Ah, you’re drunk, you’re drunk you silly old fool, still you can not see That’s a lovely sow that me mother sent to me Well, it’s many a day I’ve travelled a hundred miles or more

But a saddle on a sow sure I never saw before

And as I went home on Tuesday night as drunk as drunk could be I saw a coat behind the door where my old coat should be Well, I called me wife and I said to her: Will you kindly tell to me

Who owns that coat behind the door where my old coat should be

Ah, you’re drunk, you’re drunk you silly old fool, still you can not see That’s a woollen blanket that me mother sent to me Well, it’s many a day I’ve travelled a hundred miles or more

But buttons in a blanket sure I never saw before

And as I went home on Wednesday night as drunk as drunk could be I saw a pipe up on the chair where my old pipe should be Well, I called me wife and I said to her: Will you kindly tell to me

Who owns that pipe up on the chair where my old pipe should be

Ah, you’re drunk, you’re drunk you silly old fool, still you can not see That’s a lovely tin whistle that me mother sent to me Well, it’s many a day I’ve travelled a hundred miles or more

But tobacco in a tin whistle sure I never saw before

And as I went home on Thursday night as drunk as drunk could be I saw two boots beneath the bed where my old boots should be Well, I called me wife and I said to her: Will you kindly tell to me

Who owns them boots beneath the bed where my old boots should be

Ah, you’re drunk, you’re drunk you silly old fool, still you can not see They’re two lovely Geranium pots me mother sent to me Well, it’s many a day I’ve travelled a hundred miles or more

But laces in Geranium pots I never saw before

And as I went home on Friday night as drunk as drunk could be I saw a head upon the bed where my old head should be Well, I called me wife and I said to her: Will you kindly tell to me

Who owns that head upon the bed where my old head should be

Ah, you’re drunk, you’re drunk you silly old fool, still you can not see That’s a baby boy that me mother sent to me Well, it’s many a day I’ve travelled a hundred miles or more

But a baby boy with his whiskers on sure I never saw before

And as I went home on Saturday night as drunk as drunk could be I saw two hands upon her breasts where my old hands should be Well, I called me wife and I said to her: Will you kindly tell to me

Who owns them hands upon your breasts where my old hands should be

Ah, you’re drunk, you’re drunk you silly old fool, still you can not see That’s a lovely night gown that me mother sent to me Well, it’s many a day I’ve travelled a hundred miles or more

But fingers in a night gown sure I never saw before

As I went home on Sunday night as drunk as drunk could be I saw a thing in her thing where my old thing should be Well, I called me wife and I said to her: Will you kindly tell to me

Who owns that thing in your thing where my old thing should be

Ah, you’re drunk, you’re drunk you silly old fool, still you can not see That’s a lovely tin whistle that me mother sent to me Well, it’s many a day I’ve travelled a hundred miles or more

But hair on a tin whistle sure I never saw before

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Ballybunion Golf Courses

Ballybunion links golf course was founded in 1893 and is a private members club. The club allow visitors to play both championship courses throughout the year.

The Old Ballybunion golf course is over one hundred years old, was designed by James McKenna, and is still played today. Robert Trent Jones was called upon to design the newer Cashen course, it’s name due to it’s location at the mouth of Cashen of the river Feale.

The course was rated 10th in the world and has been host to many world-class golf tournaments including 2000 Murphy’s Irish Open, The Home Internationals in 2003 and the Palmer Cup in 2004.

A host of famous people and celebrities have played the course over the years including the then Predistent of Ameraica Bill Clinton. There is a statue of Bill in front of the Garda station in Ballybunion town.

Ballybunion golf links course is not for beginners as it offers many challenges to even the experienced player.

Ballybunion Golf Club

Designed by architects Robert Trent Jones, the Cashen links course in this stunning setting represents a true paradise for those golfers willing to challenge what is widely commended as one of the most superb links golf courses in Ireland.

You will likely be besotted at first sight of the beautiful seaside Cashen golf course. It comes as no surprise to learn that, due to the majestic beauty of this setting, and it’s playability, many famous people including:

Tiger Woods, Bill Clinton, Nick Faldo, Vijay Singh, Greg Norman, Ernie Els, Mark Calcavecchia, Byron Nelson, Lee Trevino, Jack Nicklaus, Cohn Montgomery, Larry Mize, Steve Jones, Wayne Grady, Ian Woosnam, Bob Murphy, Jerry Pate, Peter Thompson, Peter Alliss, Deane Beman, Ken Venturi, Ben Wright, Pat Bradley, Val Skinner, Cindy Rarick and many more…

About Ballybunion GC

The Ballybunion Cashen golf course, in addition to boasting impressive seascapes and surrounding landscape scenery, has a professional staff on hand, a fully stocked Pro Shop, a spacious and comfortable clubhouse restaurant and bar and it has earned a status for having a most friendly and relaxed atmosphere, where visitors are made feel more than welcome. Don’t forget the ‘Old Course’ at Ballybunion too, a woundrful links course established in 1893.

A trip to Ballybunion (or indeed Ireland!) would not be complete without playing this most prized and scenic of Kerry’s golfing jewels.

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Walk Mount Brandon on The Dingle Peninsula

For hikers and mountaineers visiting the west of Ireland, Mount Brandon on Dingles Peninsula is a place you must visit.

Not only will you enjoy the challenge of the mountain itself, but we hope you will be inspired by the peninsula’s landscapes, seascapes and the rich heritage that surrounds this high region generally referred to as the Brandon Group. The mountain’s rough rocky landscape is a result of a grating ice-age glacier that pulled and gouged the earth as it melted, shifted and receded.

Mount Brandon ridge is the ninth highest in Ireland, and offers spectacular views of the region. On clear day you may even hope to see the ‘Unknown Continent’ to the west (Newfoundland USA) that inspired the areas famous Saint Brendan to embark on his daring voyage to reach that land and bring religion to its natives. In fact, the mountain range is named after Saint Brendan who stayed on the mountain and fasted, prayed and prepared for his famous voyage.

His amazing and successful journey that took him and his fourteen monks seven years to complete, and is just one facet of the rich heritage of the Dingle Peninsula. Indeed, Brendan is the patron saint of Kerry and his journey has inspired many people around the world. Among these people was travel adventurer and author Tim Severin, who in the 1970’s set out from Brandon Creek in a boat similar to Brandon’s to retrace the journey and live the experience.

Walkers make regular trips to the mountain and Christian pilgrims also follow the ancient path now known as The Saints Road, and is marked with many small white crosses along the path. At the summit there is a large metallic cross to mark the end of the walk. This path greatly pre-dates the arrival of Christianity in Ireland and some historians believe it was originally a pagan pilgrim path for the greatest of all Irish deities, the sun god Lug Lámh Fada (Lug Of The Long Reach). No doubt pagans still walk this track to the ridge of the mountain to this very day.

If you mean to hike Mount Brandon alone, ensure you prepare for any type of weather, make sure you have warm clothes and strong hiking boots. Also include rain gear and snacks in your pack. You can also join organised walks with local walking clubs or go with a pre-booked Dingle Peninsula walking tour. If walking alone, make sure your inform people of your destination, your route and a time you expect to return.

You may also wish to bring a survival bag and survival blanket (metallic, extra water and signalling glow-sticks. There have been fatalities on Mount Brandon so please take every precaution to ensure you have an enjoyable and safe trip.

If on a clear day, you may be able to see Brendan’s ‘Unknown Continent’ to the west…

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The Rare Old Mountain Dew

Chorus Let the grasses grow and the waters flow, In a free and easy way, But give me enough of that rare old stuff, That’s made near Galway Bay. Come gougers all, From Donegal, Sligo and Leitrim too, And we’ll give you the slip as we take a sip,

Of the rare old mountain dew.

At the foot of the hill there’s a neat little still, Where the smoke curls up to the sky; By the whiff of the smell you can plainly tell There’s poitin boys nearby. For it fills the air, with a perfume rare, That betwixt both me and you, And as on we roll, we’ll drink a bowl,

Or a bucketfull of mountain dew.

Now learned men who use the pen Have wrote the praises high; Of the sweet poitin from Ireland green, Distilled with wheat and rye. Forget your pills,it will cure all ills Of the Pagan, Christian or Jew, Take off your coat and grease your throat

With the rare old mountain dew.